process spiritual mental stress

Home

Area of Practice

Kevin Wickes, Ph.D,LPC

Fees

Community

Resources:

Collaborative Process/Law

Co-parenting

Contact

“Happiness is not a matter of intensity but of balance, order, rhythm and harmony.”
 -- Thomas Merton

Integrative Counseling Services, Inc.

150 Oakland Ave. Suite 200, Rock Hill, SC 29730  ~ Telephone: 843 647-1162 ~  Office Hours: 9 am - 5 pm, Mon-Fri

What is Collaborative Practice?

Collaborative Practice is a voluntary dispute resolution process in which parties settle without resort to litigation. In Collaborative Practice:

1. The parties sign a collaborative participation agreement describing the nature and scope of the matter;

2. The parties voluntarily disclose all information which is relevant and material to the matter that must be decided;

3. The parties agree to use good faith efforts in their negotiations to reach a mutually acceptable settlement;

4. Each party must be represented by a lawyer whose representation terminates upon the undertaking of any contested court proceeding;

5. The parties may engage mental health and financial professionals whose engagement terminates upon the undertaking of any contested court proceeding; and

6. The parties may jointly engage other experts as needed.

Collaborative Practice provides you and your spouse or partner with  the support and guidance of your own lawyers without going to court.  Additionally, Collaborative Practice allows you the benefit of coaches,  child and financial specialists all working together with you on your team.

In Collaborative Practice, core elements form your commitments to this process, which are to:

  • Negotiate a mutually acceptable resolution without having courts decide issues.
  • Maintain open communication and information sharing.
  • Create shared solutions acknowledging the highest priorities of all.
            • Whatscp Img1                                          Whatscp Img2

What is Co-Parenting?

Co-Parenting is a tool utilized in focusing on how to raise children in a two-household environment as a result of separation/divorce. The co-parents mutually agree:

1. to Learn how to effectively communicate and co-parent for the children’s well-being;

2. to Understand and Comprehend the impact of separation/divorce on the children;

3. to Decide to minimize and/or eliminate parental conflicts that negatively impact the children and often put their children torn between the co-parents;

4. to Develop and Act on a co-parent plan that will guide them on how to raise the children;

5. to Respect the parental choices of each other; and

6. to Create a positive and safe environment for their children to grow.

The co-parent counselor will provide, coach, consult, guide, counsel, and etc. to achieve/obtain the above goals.  The co-parent counselor will minimize or eliminate being biased to either parent and continue to keep the focus on the well-being of the children.

In Co-Parenting, the following are the core elements, which are to:

  • Communicate effectively.
  • Respect/Honor the co-parent roles.
  • Establish healthy and adaptable/flexible (and often times firm) boundaries.
            • Whatscp Img2                                                                   Whatscp Img1

Member of

 

member of the American Psychological Association

 

member of american school counselor association

Member of South Carolina Collaborative Process Law

 

member of the York County Regional Camber of Commerce, Rock Hill, SC

Click on the icon to be re-directed to the professional associations

Education in

Doctorate in Counseling Psychology

Masters in School Counseling and College Student Personnel

Bachelors in Public Relations and Secondary Education

Experienced in

Substance Abuse and Addictions

Depression and Anxiety

Trauma and Abuse

Marriage and Family

Career and EAP

Interpersonal Communication

  Copyright 2011 - 2017, rockhillcounselors.com. All rights reserved.

 

 

 

member of the American Psychological Association

member of american school counselor association